The Mad Scientist's Daughter - Cassandra Rose Clarke

Finn looks and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task is to tutor Cat. As she grows into a beautiful young woman, Finn is her guardian,her constant companion...and more. But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, however, Finn struggles to find his place in the world, and in Cat's heart.




I've been on a Cassandra Rose Clarke binge since I read her Assassin's Curse duology last year (currently also reading the wizard's promise by her) and when I found out about this book, I knew I had to read it, I'm very glad I did. Even though this book broke my heart (kind of a happy ending though!) it was still amazing.


This book follows Cat and her transition from a child to a teen to an adult, from the moment she's introduced to Finn and her progression growing up with him. 


When I was reading about the book and reviews, there's was a mush of people saying that they bawled and some that didn't cry. I was right in the middle. I was teary eyed for a majority of the book with only just a few moments that I cried to and I had to put the book down because of it. This book left me so emotional and with one of the worst book hangovers I've ever had. 


Normally I don't read books like this. I'm not the hugest fan of scifi, but to me, this book didn't feel like one. To me it read like a contemporary book with the small minor detail of Finn being a robot. It wasn't a typical science fiction and I was almost shocked when I remembered that this wasn't realistic fiction. (Weird I know.) 


Even with saying all that, I don't even know where to begin. (Then again I never know where to begin with my reviews so.)


I guess I'll start off with Cat. I loved Cat. The way the author wrote was so beautiful and evocative that it made the story feel so real and I felt emotionally connected with it. I felt for Cat. With everything that she did or happened to her, it literally felt like I was there. Cat is full with all these conflicting emotions throughout the whole book. She's filled self disgust and guilt because of her feelings for Finn, and that's a prominent thing in the book. There's also the fact that even though Finn isn't human, she can't understand why people don't see it. There were also things that happened to her that hit hard close to him. It was very easy to connect to her.


"It's impossible to love something you know's made out of wire and metal."
"You talk about him like he's a computer."
"He is a computer," said Dr Condon. "That's what I'm trying to tell you."
"It's not flesh and blood," she said. "It's not normal.



That scene in particular was pretty emotional. 


This book still has me speechless. I still don't even know how to describe what I felt for this book. However, I did wish there was more Finn and Cat interaction (though there hally couldn't be any because of how the book was written.) and I also would have liked so read a bit of Finn's mind and what was going on in his head during the whole book. Despite that, everyone that wants their heart broken needs to read this book.